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never-obey:

cassandrajp:

tarynel:

lastnightsmusings:

"i am not at all physically attracted to you"

is an absolutely valid reason to not want to date someone.

People had the nerve to call me shallow for this.

By the way, it’s also totally cool to turn someone down without explaining your reasons. You are not interested, no will suffice. Do not feel pressured to explain your decisions to someone else. 

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(Source: redsuns-n-orangemoons)

Writing and reading fanfiction isn’t just something you do; it’s a way of thinking critically about the media you consume, of being aware of all the implicit assumptions that a canonical work carries with it, and of considering the possibility that those assumptions might not be the only way things have to be.

"At this late date, fanfiction has become wildly more biodiverse that the canonical works that it springs from. It encompasses male pregnancy, centaurification, body swapping, apocalypses, reincarnation, and every sexual fetish, kink, combination, position, and inversion you can imagine and probably a lot more that you could but would probably prefer not to. It breaks down walls between genders and genres and races and canons and bodies and species and past and future and conscious and unconscious and fiction and reality. Culturally speaking, this work used to be the job of the avant garde, but in many ways fanfiction has stepped in to take that role. If the mainstream has been slow to honor it, well, that’s usually the fate of aesthetic revolutions. Fanfiction is the madwoman in mainstream culture’s attic, but the attic won’t contain it forever."

Anne Jamison. Fic: Why Fanfiction is Taking Over the World. 2013

(via deleted-scenes)

cherry82:

fooboo24:

cyndal-:

This is a photo of the best and worst purchase I have ever made in my life. It is a kotatsu. For those of you unfamiliar, a kotatsu is a Japanese heated table. The top of the table comes off, you put a blanket on in the cold seasons, and then put the table top back on. There are small space heaters underneath the whole table and when you stick your feet under there, it’s a toasty oven of pure bliss. It’s great on heating bills because I don’t turn on my heat, just my kotatsu. It’s the best and the worst purchase because it’s fucking awesome yet it’s so awesome I never want to leave the thing and end up missing school because who the fuck wants to get out from under a toasty oven of pure bliss? Not this bitch. My advice to you, is that you should totally get a kotatsu but only if you have the will power and self control to not get trapped under there. It’s so addicting, I even sleep under it sometimes…

i am so getting a kotatsu

I will own one…one day.

Years ago I learned a very cool thing about Robin Williams, and I couldn’t watch a movie of his afterward without thinking of it. I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider. For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event, anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements. You can learn a lot about a person from their rider. This is where rocks bands list their requirement for green M&Ms (which is actually a surprisingly smart thing to do). This is also where a famous environmentalist requires a large gas-guzzling private jet to fly to the event city, but then requires an electric or hybrid car to take said environmentalist to the event venue when in view of the public.
When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found. He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work. I never watched a Robin Williams movie the same way after that. I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back. I wonder how many production companies continued the practice into their next non-Robin Williams project, as well as how many people got a chance at a job and the pride of earning an income, even temporarily, from his actions. He was a great multiplier of his impact. Let’s hope that impact lives on without him. Thanks, Robin Williams - not just for laughs, but also for a cool example.
Brian Lord.org (via wonderwoundedhearers)

(Source: gypsy-hip)

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